Posts

The State of Credit Capture – Secure in Credit Comfort

The system was designed in such way that we no longer see buying things cash as wise. There’s a credit culture it has created. A culture of having without owning. A culture of borrowing without wanting to borrow. We’re locked up for life. If you think about it, you’ll realise how inhuman this system is.

Look around you. If walls could speak they’ll tell you how the system destroyed family (especially the black family). The family unit has been crushed because the system demands blood, sweat and tears. It needs us to work for credit. Since when was it correct for us to get excited when we qualify for credit? What went wrong?

The system mocks and discards those who can afford to purchase without using credit. It romentise credit and protects those who qualify until they are unable to feed it.

It almost seems and feels weird for one not to be in debt. We have normalised what is abnormal. We aren’t afraid to swim in a pool of debt. Sadly, our wealth creation is in the intensive care unit (ICU) surviving on oxygen drips yet we preach “economic freedom in our lifetime.” We March to banks on Monday for the Apartheid money “they owe our government” and then run to them to get credit on Tuesday morning. We’re trapped in the system.

“Come on in and get a discount when you join us.” – the famous line said by those who are also trapped in the system. The most disturbing reality is that we are beginning to believe in this fable. It’s a hoax! It’s a trap. It’s all lies. Oh, I forgot that we know all that. We know it all. We know that we are captured and “mara re tla reng.”

Work on your gifts

Have you ever spent time to find out what is that one thing that you are good at? That one thing that when you have done, people are always raving about it. That one thing you can do without strive but people find very hard to do. In most cases, people wish they could do what you can. They keep asking you to teach them how to do it but they fail to bring it out the same way you can. You are considered the best at that one thing. It could be baking, cooking, cleaning, mathematics or driving. Whatever it is, do it with all might.

When you page through the Bible, you will notice a scripture that speaks to the ability to create wealth (Deuteronomy8:18), however what we always miss out on is the importance of working hard. We never give ourselves time to sharpen our skills, gifts or talents. Each of us has been blessed with one or more gifts which are special to others who don’t have them. Each one of us is born with incredible gifts that can help all of us at some point. To think that we you are not born with a talent or gift, is not only incorrect but also an insult to your creator because we are all born with special gifts that will help better our lives and other people’s lives as well.

“A gift opens the way and ushers the giver into the presence of the great.” – Proverbs 18:16

Most of the time you don’t work hard on your gift because you still have doubts about its power. You don’t know how powerful it is and as a result, you waste your great potential. Have you seen many great people not using their God-given talents and how frustrated you get thinking how you could make a huge difference if God had given you the same gift? I sometimes wish I knew how to sing. I know that I would go all out to make sure that people listen to my songs every chance they get.

The biggest problem is that we never work hard on our gifts. We either limit ourselves or do not know how powerful they are. The Bible in the book of Proverbs 14:23 says “All hard work brings a profit, but mere talk leads only to poverty.” If you work hard on your gifts, you will create success out of them. On the other side, if you don’t, you will become poor. Wouldn’t you want to become successful because of something you are passionate about? Wouldn’t you want to travel the world and touch millions of lives because of your special gift? Think long and hard about it.

My prayer for you this week is that you realise your gifts/talents and work hard for them. Make them greater. We deserve to experience your greatness.

What’s wrong with Haiti?

A century ago, US troops invaded and occupied a small country called Haiti. They stayed there for almost two decades, installed a client government, imposed new laws and fought insurgents in bloody battles on difficult terrain. Thousands of residents perished during what turned out to be 19 years of ‘de facto U.S. rule’.
 
Today, many Americans think of Haiti as a country that is still struggling to recover from a devastating earthquake, but fewer realise that it’s recovering from an invasion that took place in 1915 which resulted in their state president being assassinated.
 
Americans had stepped in under the guise of dismantling anarchy and fostering democracy. But in reality, two things drove their actions: a desire to curb Haiti’s economy and government in a direction that was more in line with their own and concern over imperialist interest from France and Germany. U.S. leaders soon pressured the Haitian legislature to elect a new pro-American president, Philippe Sudré Dartiguenave.
 
When we look at Haiti’s current challenges, we often overlook the bigger problem it has been facing since 1915 and that is Americans invading another country to extract it’s minerals and imposing laws and dictating presidential elections. We are just not looking deeper into the crisis Haiti is facing. We are simply ignoring the overwhelming and most visible facts of Haiti’s real challenges. In an article I published in 2013, I go even deeper to question “are the so called natural disasters really natural?” is my quest to understand the challenges facing Haiti.
 
What you must know is that around 2,400 sq km of northern Haiti – or about 8% of the surface of the entire country – could be ripped away from local farmers and given to US and Canadian companies. In 2012, the mineral wealth for this area, which includes gold, copper and silver, was estimated to be worth more than $20bn.
 
Alarmingly, some contracts have been granted behind closed doors, without scrutiny or participation by Haitian civil society or parliament. Opening this kind of opportunity to foreign investors without proper laws, enforcement and transparency in place has created much anger among the population and some politicians alike.
 
What is happening to the citizens of Haiti is an emotional and traumatic experience. We cannot deny the evident pain the people of Haiti are facing, but we can’t keep quiet about the underlying issues that America has with Haiti. If a government is destabilised, it cannot control or prevent the disasters it finds itself in and that is where Haiti finds itself.
 
I will continue to pray for Haiti, but I also want America to leave Haiti alone.